How to Break AND Fix a Chocolate Ganache

I am taking chocolate fudge cupcakes to a friend’s birthday party tonight! I baked them late last night and took a break from work this afternoon to frost them. I decided to fill them with dark chocolate ganache and top them off with either Gianduja chocolate frosting or Peanut butter-cream frosting. I will write about how the cakes turned out soon enough, this post however is all about the ganache. More specifically, it is about how to break a chocolate ganache and then, fix it. Why, you ask, would you want to know how to break a ganache? Well, because then you’ll know what not to do when YOU make your next ganache, of course. And if you manage to break your ganache in a unique and entirely different manner than the one chronicled below, why then read on, and you will find how to fix it!

A dark chocolate ganache should taste smooth and rich. This is how it should look:

Chocolate ganache
This is how a chocolate ganache ought to look; a broken ganache will look oily and goopy not smooth and even like this.
Unfortunately for me, things went horribly wrong. I ended up with an awful, goopy, oily mess. I didn’t take a picture of it, but here is a link to someone else’s photograph of a ruined ganache that looks very much like mine did.

I think this might be because I added cold vanilla extract from the fridge, when in fact, I should have ensured that it was at room temperature.

I panicked and tried various ways of fixing it. First, I heated it on low in the microwave. When that didn’t work, I tried heating it in a double boiler. Finally, I tried to fix it by adding a few tablespoons of warm milk one at a time. After each table-spoon, I gently stirred the mixture with a whisk. And Voila! It worked! Here is what I ended up with:

Fixed chocolate ganache
Fixed, but slightly thin, ganache
It is smooth and even, the way it out to be. However, the mixture is a bit thinner than my previous ganaches have been. It’ll firm up in a bit I am sure, and since I am using it as a filling for cupcakes this might even be a happy accident, as it might be nice to have a softer filling inside the cakes. On the other hand, if I was going to be making truffles with this ganache, I might have a problem on my hands.

Ps. I washed my hands before I dipped my finger in that ganache!

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13 Comments Add yours

  1. margaret21 says:

    That looks really useful advice. Thanks. It would be good if I never had to use it, but I bet I’ll need to sooner or later.

    1. choconutmeg says:

      I hope you never will 🙂

  2. Karen says:

    Thank you!! You helped save my ganache! God bless you :)))

    1. choconutmeg says:

      You’re welcome 🙂

  3. Anonymous says:

    Perfect!!!! I worked like a charm. Thank you so much!

    1. choconutmeg says:

      I am glad it helped! What did you make?

      1. Anonymous says:

        I was making a chocolate satin frosting that started of with an unsweetened chocolate ganache.

      2. choconutmeg says:

        I hope it was delicious 🙂

  4. Anonymous says:

    Magic!! You saved my day!!

    1. choconutmeg says:

      You’re welcome 🙂

  5. Anonymous says:

    Saved my ganache and my sanity too… thank you…. it really works!

    1. choconutmeg says:

      Ha ha, you are SO welcome! Thank you for commenting; I really appreciate it 🙂

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